Guerrilla Marketing

Why Guerrilla Marketing Must Evolve

The term “guerrilla marketing” was coined by American businessman Jay Conrad Levinson in his 1984 book of the same name. The term draws on the concept of guerrilla warfare and it purports to outline a philosophy, a strategy, and a set of tools that can be used by small businesses to gain marketing traction despite their inherently low budgets.

A Ferrari Engine to Illustrate The Asymmetric Marketing Engine

The Asymmetric Marketing Engine

Marketing is rife with models and concepts – many of which, when compared, are contradictory and either too complex or too shallow. My military training leads me to believe that models should be as simple as possible and should resonate with the knowledge and understanding that comes from empirical evidence and experience.

Small Business is the Heart and Soul of the Economy

Helpful Small Businesses Resources

There is a lot of talk about how the government is creating programs to help small businesses during this crisis. Here are a few resources that can help guide you through the challenge of finding assistance for your business.

Luck Favors the Prepared

“Luck favors the prepared.”

I’ve heard this quote many times in my life and I have used it liberally with my teams. I believe that it is a variation of a quote by Louis Pasteur. Dwight Eisenhower said, “Luck is where preparation meets opportunity.” Both of these quotes highlight the necessity for preparation.

Virtual Office - Asymmetric

The (rapid) Move to Virtual Work

The transition to virtual work has been underway for more than a decade. Many people, gig workers, freelancers, creatives, etc. have been working remotely for years. But recent events with the COVID-19 pandemic have forced many businesses to move employees to virtual office settings very rapidly

Asymmetric Business Strategy

Business Wargaming

A core challenge for all businesses is to understand, anticipate, and prepare for competitive activity in the marketplace. Many business plans contain a section on competition, but the level of detail is often woefully inadequate to arrive at any sort of meaningful understanding of the competitive landscape.